Cole Stanton & Tim Riley Chemistry & Chemical Products in Water Damage, Mold, HVAC and Bio Recovery Standards

Air Date: 7-27-2012| Episode: 253


This week on IAQ Radio we are joined by Cole Stanton, VP Sales at Fiberlock Technologies, Inc and Tim Riley founder of Crime and Death Scene Cleaning of Ipswich, MA. We will be discussing chemistry, chemicals and standards for HVAC cleaning, water damage restoration, mold remediation and bio recovery cleaning…

Full Description:

This week on IAQ Radio we are joined by Cole Stanton, VP Sales at Fiberlock Technologies, Inc and Tim Riley founder of Crime and Death Scene Cleaning of Ipswich, MA. We will be discussing chemistry, chemicals and standards for HVAC cleaning, water damage restoration, mold remediation and bio recovery cleaning. Mr. Stanton was part of the committee that wrote the NADCA position paper on Chemicals in HVAC Systems and is currently on the IICRC S520 Revision committee. He and Mr. Riley both serve on the IICRC S540 “Standard and Reference Guide for Trauma and Crime Scene Biological and Infectious Hazard Clean Up” development committee. The S540 is a new standard devoted to bio recovery issues. Mr. Riley is a veteran Bio Recovery company owner and American Bio Recovery Association (ABRA) instructor.

Z-Man’s Blog:

Formulation and Remediation

On today’s episode of IAQradio, Joe and I were joined by: Cole Stanton, Executive VP of Fiberlock Technologies a formulator of specialty coatings and remediation; and Tim Riley who’s company Crime and Death Scene Cleaning specializes in the abatement of biological and infectious hazards. Both Cole and Tim are participants in industry standard writing activities.

Nuggets mined from today’s episode:

(Cole’s comments)

· NADCA position paper on the use of chemicals in HVAC systems provides guidance on what has been a controversial and contentious issue.

· Fungicidal versus mold resistant coatings have been proven efficacious in killing residual mold. Mold resistant coatings contain a registered antimicrobial to protect the dry coating film.

· DFE (Design for Environment) has ruled out many antimicrobial active ingredients such as quats and phenolic and may eventually rule in hydrogen peroxide, lactic acid & citric acid.

· H202-Hydrogen peroxide is a known antimicrobial. The use of hydrogen peroxide based products in cleaning and restoration projects provides labor saving benefits, inherent stain removal characteristic reduces scrubbing, scouring and sanding.

(Tim’s comments)

· IICRC Standard and reference Guide for Trauma and Crime Scene Biological and Infectious Hazard Cleanup is limited to blood borne pathogens and excludes hoarders, animal contamination, etc.

· Some trauma cleanup personnel leave the business for psychological reasons.

· While crime is down, work is abundant due to deaths from natural causes and suicides.

· Keys to proper trauma cleanup- OSHA requirements: written program, training, vaccination, PPE and disposal of contaminate as medical waste.

· Factors to consider when bidding a trauma scene cleanup: parking when project is located in a densely populated urban area, security requirements, what occurred, extent of contamination, quantity of material removal required, chemical complications (presence of finger print powder, Luminol staining, etc.) type of PPE required, containment area for donning and doffing PPE.

· Odor removal procedures for trauma scene cleanup include: source removal in conjunction with-spray antimicrobials for odor knockdown, hydroxyl ion generators, air scrubbers with activated carbon and/or potassium permanganate media and ozone.

· Post Remediation Verification Inspection, looks, good, smells good, option of using ATP for clearance.

· Most interesting project was the anthrax cleanup at ABC News in NYC. While remediators were protected by Level C gear, ABC didn’t provide PPE for their employees.

Today’s Music: Ask a mortician, episode six (Youtube)

Z-Man signing off

 

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