Jim Pemberton & The Z-Man Restoration Industry Education: Part 1

Air Date: 9-23-2016| Episode: 432


This week on IAQ Radio the Z-Man welcomes Jim Pemberton to discuss industry education issues. Jim has been involved in the cleaning and restoration industry for 37 years. He is a 2nd generation industry trainer who is passionate about industry training and is committed to improving it…

Full Description:

This week on IAQ Radio the Z-Man welcomes Jim Pemberton to discuss industry education issues. Jim has been involved in the cleaning and restoration industry for 37 years. He is a 2nd generation industry trainer who is passionate about industry training and is committed to improving it. Jim Pemberton grew up working in his father’s cleaning and restoration business, is a 2nd generation industry trainer and is President of Pembertons Cleaning and Restoration Supplies. Jim has been training cleaners throughout the US and Canada since 1979, has been a featured presenter at many industry events, has contributed articles to leading trade journals and is recognized as a “master of most things textile”. Join them at noon eastern time today when Cliff “Z-Man” Zlotnik and Jim Pemberton discuss industry education and suggest ways to make it better.

Z-Man’s Blog:

Dropout

Jim Pemberton, who grew up working in his father’s cleaning and restoration business is a second generation industry trainer, President of Pemberton’s Cleaning and Restoration Supplies, featured industry speaker and author.

When I was growing up( in the 1950s-60s) dropout was used to describe teenagers who willingly stopped attending high school.Dropping out means leaving a school, college, university or group for practical reasons, necessities, or disillusionment with the system from which the individual in question leaves.[i]After losing enthusiasm for teaching IICRC course five years ago, Jim: dropped out as an IICRC instructor, put his PowerPoints and projector away and began focusing entirely on the technical needs his students. Pembertons Interlink Supply continues to sponsor IICRC courses.

Nuggets mined from today’s episode:

Jim Pemberton is a 2nd generation industry educator and son of an industry visionary and pioneer who likens his teaching style to “more of the same” of his fathers. When he first started teaching, Jim liked the chemistry and vocabulary; now he focuses his training on the needs of the job his students work on.

The IICRC didn’t follow a formal course development model they created their own.

Over time, IICRC courses have improved. Jim admires the men and women who teach them. Unfortunately there is often insufficient time for realistically meaningful hands-on training.

Reading about or clicking on a marketing idea psychologically equates to having used it. Collecting industry certifications may fill a psychological need?

He is troubled that our industry’s technical training still relies upon 20th century teaching methods to teach 21st century students. Too many industry courses have students sitting in classroom for 2-3+ days bored by PowerPoint.

IICRC courses do not differentiate between information that’s critical versus information that’s nice to know.  Too much rote memory of facts.

“Passing the test and failing the course.”After personal experience with students who passed the exam and didn’t master the technical skills, Jim models his course after the needs of the job.

Opines that vocabulary, math, health and safety are suited to computer based learning while hands-on skills are not. How to wield tools, ergonomics, donning and doffing of PPE equipment, fine detail work are better learned hands-on.

Business owners must determine their own goals and needs for technical training.

Business owners have a responsibility to adequately prepare their employees for training.

Basic skills are critically important. Employees are under more scrutiny than ever before and may be unknowingly spied upon and recorded by “nanny cams”.

During courses, students are under stress. Exams add more stress. Jim doesn’t have written exams in his courses.

“Certification, is when another party says you know the information you were taught.”

IICRC courses need a big fix.

Students need sufficient quantities of realistically soiled materials to work on. Students benefit by observing multiple methods, and equipment and tool options.

After completion of the course, students have opportunity to interact with Jim and other students on a private Facebook membership group.

In class:  Jim first gathers students, then explains what will happen, breaks the group into small teams, and the teams begin work with rapid interaction. Time outs: periodic meetings to discuss, preview and review using structured reporting and discussion. Building confidence and belief they are better at what they do.

To improve industry training, Jim suggests we get around better minds who understand technical education.

Technical training in operational restoration facilities and rug plants offers superior learning opportunity.

Jim’s biggest regret was not dropping out sooner.

Helping people, improving lives and careers, making a positive difference are the accomplishments of which he is most proud.

Jim credits Lisa Wagner for opening his eyes and encouraging him to create his training alternative.

Beyond technical competence and proficiency, workers need thelower management skills of:  communication, customer service skills and sales

“It isn’t what we don’t know that gives us trouble, it’s what we know that ain’t so.”

I don’t remember the year either 2007 or 2008, I do remember well the day that I stopped teaching IICRC courses. For me it was the first time, I would be teaching the newly revised Water Restoration Technician course. The course contained additional information I didn’t believe to be accurate. I was disillusioned. I’m also a dropout.

Z-Man signing off

Trivia:

Name the father of vocational education in the US who also was an architect of the Smith-Hughes Act of 1917.

Answer: Charles Allen Prosser

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