Sam Rashkin, R.A. Chief Architect Building Technologies Program, U.S. DOE – Building America, Combining Energy Efficiency & IAQ

Air Date: 2-22-2013| Episode: 275


This week on IAQ Radio we welcome Sam Rashkin, Chief Architect for the Department of Energy’s Building Technologies Office, Sam’s primary role is leading deployment of successful research for new and existing high-performance homes. ..

Full Description:

This week on IAQ Radio we welcome Sam Rashkin, Chief Architect for the Department of Energy’s Building Technologies Office, Sam’s primary role is leading deployment of successful research for new and existing high-performance homes. This includes helping to lead DOE’s world-class research program, Building America, in developing a new resource tool that will make latest innovations and best practices fully accessible to residential new construction and retrofit stakeholders. He is also overseeing a completely revamped DOE Challenge Home voluntary labeling program for leading edge home builders. In his prior position, he managed ENERGY STAR for Homes since its start in 1996. Under his leadership, ENERGY STAR for Homes grew exponentially to more than 8,500 builder partners, over one million labeled homes, and over 25 percent market penetration nationwide. Mr. Rashkin is widely recognized as an expert on how energy efficiency and indoor air quality must work in tandem.

Z-Man’s Blog:

Rushing with Rashkin

Today’s guest on IAQradio, Sam Rashkin, R.A. is Chief Architect for the Dept. of Energy’s Building Technologies Office, where his primary responsibility is leading the development of successful research for new and existing high performance homes. Unfortunately Sam only had a limited amount of time to spend with the IAQradio listening audience.

Nuggets mined from today’s show:

· High performance houses (HPHs) are very tight and consequently difficult to dry when wetted. IAQ is an important consideration in HPHs

· Powerful fans incorporated into HPHs can create negative pressures increasing the risk of downdrafts.

· 4% is the average corporate investment in R&D. Only .4% is invested in R&D for housing. Build America is the hub of information for builders and contractors.

· Build America’s top 32 innovations have been transformative to high performance housing, examples include: high performance wall systems, more efficient duct systems, advanced framing systems, high efficiency water heating, etc.

· HPHs don’t need to cost more than conventional homes.

· The Residential Energy Service Network’s Home Energy Rating System (HERS) is an industry standard for measuring energy efficiency and inspecting and calculating energy performance.

· When queried about risks from insured perils such as fires and water damage? Sam opined that HPHs have less potential for wetting and are therefor better protected from air and moisture flow. He is confident that rather than create potential problems that HPHs reduce risks and problem and address a myriad of problems.

· http://www1.eere.energy.gov/buildings/residential/residential_bookmark.html

· Sam Rashkin’s new book “Retooling the U.S. Housing industry: How It Got Here, Why It’s Broken, and How to Fix It”

I opine that only time will tell whether or not the unintentional consequences of green building and high performance construction will outweigh the energy saving benefits?

Be sure the basic fundamentals of building science are correct before selecting low VOC finishes and furnishings.

Today’s Music: “What is Energy” by Tom Glazer and Dottie Evans
Z-Man signing off

 

Please follow and like us: